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David Zurawik Hyperventilates On Elon Musk Twitter Takeover

CNN contributor David Zurawik sounded the alarm over Elon Musk’s Twitter purchase as he warned of dire implications if sociopolitical discourse were to fall under Musk and Mark Zuckerberg’s control without stringent regulation.

Zurawik joined brian steller on Sunday to discuss what Musk’s takeover will mean for the social media platform, and argued that the “bigger problem” than Musk’s personality is “how we are going to control the channels of communication in this country?”

“In 1927 we had the Radio Act, 1934 the Communications Act. Congress stepped in. We made rules,” Zurawik said. “The FCC wasn’t great but it’s still regulating the broadcast industry. You can’t use vulgar language and do all of these things with speech. We gave over what amounts to our airwaves or internet waves to Mark Zuckerberg and Elon Musk, and we are in so much trouble because those guys believe in making money.”

Zurawik made his point by referring to how Zuckerberg allowed Russian political groups to purchase ads on Facebook and sow chaos during the 2016 election. After predicting a dispute between Musk and the FCC, Zurawik warned “This is dangerous! We can’t think anymore in this country!”

“I’m serious! We don’t have people in Congress who can make regulations, that can make it work. I think we can look to the Western countries in Europe for how they are trying to limit it,” he said. “But you need controls on this. You need regulation. You cannot let these guys control discourse in this country, or we are headed to hell! We are there. [Former President Donald] Trump opened the gates of hell, and now they’re chasing us down!”

Zurawik’s remarks wound up taking off on Twitter — where the clip has already racked up hundreds of thousands of views. Reactors were concerned with his support of him for “censorship” and regulated speech:

Watch above, via CNN.

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